The 44th Everyone Reading Conference

The 2017 Everyone Reading conference, will be held on March 13-14, 2017 at the CUNY (City University of New York) Graduate Center on Fifth Avenue at 34th Street.

We will be exhibiting the Tiger Tuesday® Reading Program

The 44rd  Everyone Reading conference will present the latest research and practice in dyslexia and reading differences as well as new strands for math, English Language Learners, advocacy and parental engagement, and the social-emotional aspects of learning disabilities.  Our participants are also especially interested in instructional and assistive technology.

Learning the Alphabet Case Study

Case Study: How Henry Learned the Alphabet

learning the alphabet case studyHenry, who had just turned five, came into my office with his mom. Mom was concerned that Henry didn’t know all the letters in the alphabet. She said that Henry had been in preschool since two years old and therefore had enough exposure to the alphabet that he should have learned the letters by now.

When I assessed Henry, he was in the above average range of intelligence, but only knew five letters…H E N R Y. As I watched Henry it was obvious that he became totally engaged when he was playing and having fun. So, I took out the Tiger Tuesday Alphabet Lotto game and invited him to play the game with me. He wanted his mom to join us and she did. Each one of us had four Lotto boards, each with different letters of the alphabet. Henry chose which boards each would get.

He then wanted to be the caller. Of course I was delighted. It meant more practice in learning the letters. As he picked up each alphabet card with an upper case letter of the alphabet, he quickly looked at his boards to see if he had that letter. When his mom got one of the letters he’d jump up and down and tell her that she was doing great. But, the final result was that Henry won.

I told him that he could keep the game. When it was back in the package he stood hugging it. As they were leaving, his mom told him that she was taking him to Toys R Us because he had done such a good job. He then said, still hugging the game against his chest,  “Can I take my alphabet game with me into the store? I love this game.” [Read more…]

Reading and Self Esteem

What to Do When Your Child Says He’s Stupid

famous people with dyslexiaThat’s a bold headline, but if you’re a parent of a child with low self-esteem, it can be heart breaking when it happens and you’ll do anything to help. Dyslexia can contribute to feelings of low self esteem.  In this edition of Ask Dr. Linda, learn how to help boost your child’s self-esteem and that many successful people struggle with and overcome dyslexia. We also have links for more information.

Hi Dr. Linda,

I really enjoy reading your columns and learn so much.  But we have an issue that I don’t think you have addressed and maybe your readers will benefit if you can help us with our situation.

My husband and I are fortunate enough to have three wonderful children. Our oldest and our youngest have always done very well in school. Our middle child is just as bright as his siblings, but he struggles in school with dyslexia.

He’s in 5th grade now and has begun saying that he’s the stupid one in the family. He’s even said that he’s the stupidest one in school. Our hearts break every time he says that. What do we do to help his self-esteem?

Thanks in advance. [Read more…]

Kids Begin Dropping Out of College in 3rd Grade

Why Kids Fail College in Elementary School & What to Do About it Now!

Why kids drop out of college in 3rd grade

3rd Grade College Dropout

Have you ever heard the expression, “He dropped out of college in the third grade?” Or “Kids begin dropping out of college in third grade.

Strange as it sounds, it’s real.

Dropping out of college — and failing to succeed in school in general — really does begin in grade school. There are many reasons for this. In order to break this failure cycle, the reasons needed to be identified and addressed.

The most common reason? Failing to learn how to read because of un-diagnosed and untreated learning disabilities.

While some children pick up reading on their own before they begin school, most children learn to read between the first and third grades. Let’s take a look at “Johnny”, a youngster who is about to finish third grade and is struggling with reading. (Suggested reading: Why Johnny Can’t Read: and what you can do about it by Rudolf Flesch)

Johnny didn’t pick up reading in first grade but he did not stand out because they were others in the same situation. By second grade there were fewer, and by third grade Johnny started to notice that almost everybody was reading but him.

Add to this his growing awareness of self that develops around this time, Johnny begins to see himself as “different.” In time, different morphs into “dumb,” with all the emotional baggage associated with this label. For Johnny, and all the Johnnies, learning to read is challenging enough. Add to that the emotional component, and the challenge grows exponentially.

It’s not too late. [Read more…]

Poor Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension skillsIs Reading Comprehension a Problem?

Sometimes kids think they can read. After all, they know all the words. But that doesn’t mean they understand what they read.

Disinterest, struggling with decoding individual words, text is too difficult for a child’s reading level, deficit in working memory which is common with kids with ADHD, visual processing disorder, and limited vocabulary cancause poor reading comprehension.

Poor Reading Comprehension Skills Lead to Poor Grades

When kids don’t understand what they read, it affects their ability to succeed in school.  All subjects, including science and math, require reading comprehension. Even Tests and exams require good reading comprehension which results in low grades and poor test scores if a student has poor reading comprehension.

 Signs of Poor Reading Comprehension [Read more…]

What is Dyslexia?

What is dyslexia?

How Phonics Help Children With Dyslexia Learn to Read

Dr. Linda advises a worried mom to have her child tested for dyslexia, and then explains what dyslexia is and why a phonics-based reading program helps.

Dear Dr. Linda,

Our daughter is in the third grade and was just diagnosed with dyslexia. She’s embarrassed to go to school, because she can’t read. My husband and I are willing to pay anyone who says that they’ll teach her to read.

One of my friends said that her son went for eye therapy and that helped him read. Another friend told me to try a program called “Fast Forward.”

Someone else mentioned trying one of the “movement-based learning” programs. Some are expensive and many involve hours of after school time.

She’s only eight, so we don’t want her to spend all day in school and after school doing schoolwork. We also don’t want to spend a lot of money unless it will help. If it will help, we’ll spend whatever we need to spend. What else is available that won’t be hours and hours a week? Claudia D.

Dear Claudia,

This is a common question. As you know, when a child is already in the third grade and still struggles with reading, many parents will [Read more…]

Improve Reading Comprehension

How to improve reading comprehension

How Having Your Child Draw Pictures Helps Them Learn to Read

Mom of 5th grader gets advice from Dr. Linda about improving her son’s reading comprehension.

Dear Dr. Linda,
My 5th grader was diagnosed with a reading problem in first grade. He’s had extra reading help since then. They take him out of class for instruction. But he’s always complained that he’s missing things in school and doesn’t feel he needs the reading class. I’ve never seen a problem. He seems to read fine when he read to me, but his teachers tell me that his reading comprehension is poor. So I haven’t argued with his teachers. However, nothing has improved. In fact, after his last review, his reading comprehension scores were worse. What do I do? Do I leave him in the reading class? Jen

Dear Jen,
I can’t answer your question about whether to leave him in the reading class or not. I would discuss this with his teacher. However, I can give you [Read more…]

Why Do Kids Hate School?

Child hates school

Does Your Child Hate School?

A 3rd grader hates school and mom asks Dr. Linda what to do. The answers include finding out if she has ADHD, or a physical problem first. Having more fun with learning and physical movement both also help.

Dear Dr. Linda:

My little girl Tammy is already whining about school starting. She’ll be in 3rd grade. I’m not really sure why she doesn’t like school. She liked her teacher last year and has lots of friends.

Her grades were o.k., but I know she could do better. She keeps telling me that school is boring and that her homework is boring. And she certainly didn’t get too much homework.

I think she makes mistakes on her arithmetic and reading worksheets because she just doesn’t pay attention. So now she’s really not reading up to her grade level. And she doesn’t know her arithmetic facts for her grade either.

Do you have any suggestions? Thanks. Perplexed Mom

Dear Perplexed Mom:

Tammy isn’t the only little girl who finds school boring. Parents sometimes ask me why do kids hate school? So many factors can cause a child to say that school is boring or that they hate it. Some kids have [Read more…]

Reading Strategies for Dyslexia

reading strategies for dyslexiaTiger Tuesday helps dyslexic kids learn to read!

Dyslexia, a common reading disorder affecting as much as 17% of the population, can affect a child’s performance in every class, even math and science. Reading is a basic skill for school success from the primary grades on through college.

All of school can be a struggle for children who can’t read. However, dyslexic children canlearn to read and do well in school if they’re provided with appropriate reading strategies for dyslexia.

The Tiger Tuesday Multisensory Interactive Reading Program provides fun activities with the reading strategies for dyslexia that kids need.

What is Dyslexia?

Children struggle with reading for many reasons. Many of these children aren’t dyslexic. Dyslexia isn’t reading backwards. It’s not a visual problem. It’s not associated with a low IQ. Many people with dyslexia are highly intelligent. Dyslexic children aren’t stupid or lazy.

According the International Dyslexia Association, “Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origi [Read more…]

How to Teach Kids to Read Words

Teaching Children to Read Step by Step

Learning to read begins with vowelsSurprisingly, learning to read begins soon after birth,  when an infant hears spoken language. The more language young children hear, the more the language part of the brain develops. Hearing a variety of words and language patterns, through conversation or by listening to and looking at picture books, promotes development in the “reading centers” of the brain.

Reading Readiness. Next, between the ages of two and four, children are introduced to the alphabet. The English alphabet is made up of 26 letters. Five letters are called vowels, a, e, i, o, and u. (Eventually they learn that w and y sometimes act like vowels.) The other 21 letters are referred to as consonants.

As an aside, for those who are interested, vowels are sounds made with unrestricted air flow through the mouth. Consonants, on the other hand, are sounds made with restricted air flow, usually by the closed lips or by the tongue against the teeth or upper palate. Interestingly, in other languages, even more complex sounds are created than English speakers are accustomed to making.    

Preschool children usually enjoy learning the alphabet because it involves fun activities like singing the ABC song, pointing to or touching the letters on cards or in games and toys, writing the letters in activity books or playing electronic alphabet games. By doing these activities they learn to recognize and write the 26 letters in the alphabet, in both upper and lower case. [Read more…]


Purposeful Playful Practice!
Tiger Tuesday makes learning to read fun, fast & easy